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Writing Resources for TEDS/TGS

The Thrive Center at Trinity International University - (847) 317-8193, thrive@tiu.edu

Video on Graduate Level Writing

Graduate-level writing handout by Dr. Dana Harris

Graduate-level Writing

Dr. Dana M. Harris

 

I.          Expectations of Graduate-level Writing

            A.        Basics of a thesis and argumentation

                        1.         A clearly stated thesis

                        2.         The importance of an outline

                        3.         Anchoring points in more than one source

                        4.         The role of footnotes

Resources:

Rolfing Library Research Guides (Writing an Academic Paper at TEDS; especially Making an Argument; Proper Style)

 

            B.        Elements of good writing

                        1.         Clarity of expression vs. obscurity

                        2.         Formal vs. informal style

                        3.         Basics of grammar and word choice

                        4.         But why bother anyway?

Resources:

Rolfing Library Research Guides (Writing an Academic Paper at TEDS; especially Making an Argument; Proper Style)

Print/Kindle Sources:

Baugh, L. Sue. Essentials of English Grammar: A Practical Guide to the Mastery of English. Third edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005.

*Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams.  The Craft of Research.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1995.  [

Strunk, William, Jr. and E. B. White. The Elements of Style. Third edition. New York: Macmillan, 1979. (Updated 2011 Kindle edition available on Amazon for $2.99)

Weston, Anthony. A Rulebook for Arguments. Third edition. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2009.

Zinsser, William. On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction. 30th Anniversary edition. New York: HarperCollins, 2012.

 

I.          Expectations of Graduate-level Writing (contd.)

            C.        Differences between graduate-level research and Bible study

                        1.         Distanciation and presuppositions

                        2.         Engagement with critical resources

                        3.         Standard presentation and formatting

Resources:

Rolfing Library Research Guides (ATLA Religion Database; Bible and Theological Reference Tools; Zotero; Research Guides by Department)

Rolfing Library Tutorials (especially Citation and Formatting Help; Word Formatting)

MyTIU.edu >> Academic Resources >> Writing Resources

 

II.        The Concept of Information Literacy

            A.        Scholarly vs. popular resources

            B.        Evangelical and nonevangelical

            C.        Appropriate internet sources

Resources:

Rolfing Library Research Guides

Rolfing Library Tutorials (especially Library Resources, Distance Research, Evaluating Websites)

                        TIU Citation Guide (especially for Kindle; e-journals; websites)

Turabian Quick Guide

Chicago Manual of Style (online site)

Citing Kindle

Electronic journal articles

Websites

 

III.       Interacting with Sources

            A.        What is plagiarism and what is wrong with it?

            B.        What constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it (unintentional vs. intentional plagiarism)

            C.        Interacting with and citing images and visual media

 

III.       Interacting with Sources (contd.)

Resources:

Rolfing Library Research Guides (Plagiarism)

Rolfing Library Tutorials (Plagiarism)

MyTIU.edu >> Academic Resources >> Writing Resources >> Academic Integrity Helps